Bell Let’s Talk Day is January 29 and We’re Joining in to Help Create Positive Change.

Mental illness affects people of all ages and from all walks of life. According to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, one in five people in Canada will experience a mental health issue or illness in any given year. Over the past 9 years, Canadians and people around the globe have joined in the world’s largest conversation around mental health on Bell Let’s Talk Day. Together we have taken big steps to reduce the stigma around mental health issues.

In a recent survey conducted by Nielsen Consumer Insights in 2019, 84% of Canadians now say they are comfortable speaking with others about mental health, compared to only 42% in 2012.

However, there is still work to be done to ensure all Canadians have access to the mental health support they need. This year, on Bell Let’s Talk Day Canadians are encouraged to share the actions, large and small, that they are taking to improve the lives of people living with mental health issues.

That’s why we’re joining in on the 10th annual Bell Let’s Talk Day to help create positive change. SafetyDriven – TSCBC is joining in to help create positive change.

When it comes to mental health, every action counts.

https://letstalk.bell.ca/en/

On Bell Let’s Talk Day, for every text, mobile and long distance call made on the Bell network, tweet using #BellLetsTalk, social media video view, or use of the Facebook frame or Snapchat filter, Bell will contribute 5 cents more to Canadian mental health programs.

 

You can also learn more about some of the organizations providing meaningful mental health supports and services throughout Canada and download the  to begin your own conversation about mental health at home, school or in the workplace.

Join in to as we work together to improve the lives of Canadians living with mental health issues and help create positive change.

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WorkSafeBC Innovation at Work Grant Opportunity

Source: WorkSafeBC.com

Do you have an idea that could help improve workplace health and safety?

Some of the best solutions start with simple ideas. This research grant can help you develop your idea into a solution that makes a difference in the workplace.

The program supports small scale research projects that lead to the development of practical solutions to address workplace health and safety issues. Research topics should align with our research priorities or our partner’s priorities.

Who can apply
Any Canadian resident can apply. Academic researchers affiliated with a college, university, or research institution may apply, but a non-academic partner must be included on the research team.

Funding and duration
Typically, these grants are a maximum of $50,000, for a duration of one year.

All standard terms and conditions apply to projects funded through Research Services. Please see the Funding conditions for details.

Funding opportunities
The 2020 grant competition will launch on November 22, 2019.

We generally issue a Request for Proposals each November. To learn about new opportunities, you can sign up to receive automatic email notifications.

Please review the Guide to the Grant Application Form for detailed information on how to submit your application package. You can also contact Research Services for assistance with completing the application form, or any questions regarding your proposed research project.

Important dates:
Application form due (required): February 14, 2020, at 4 p.m..


Visit WorkSafeBC for more information and grant application forms.

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It’s Time to talk

Source: Trucknews.com

Accidents, loneliness, and fatigue are all part of the job as a truck driver. But does this make them more at risk for mental illness?

TORONTO, Ont. – It’s an uncomfortable topic to bring up with friends and family, let alone bosses and coworkers. It’s not nearly talked about enough in most industries, and certainly not discussed enough in trucking.

Mental health.

Statistics show that on any given week, more than half a million Canadians will miss work because of a mental health problem. And those numbers don’t include those people who mask their mental health issues as something else.

Studies also show that one in five Canadians are suffering from mental illness today.

However, truck drivers in particular seem to be at a greater risk for mental illness when you take a closer look at the nature of the occupation.

Being out on the road, alone, sometimes for weeks at a time, takes a toll on one’s mental health. It’s lonely. There’s close calls, accidents, time away from family, and stressful situations happening every day on the road.

Truck driving is a profession with one of the highest rates of injuries. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) published a study in 2012 that revealed close to one third of the 3.5 million drivers in the U.S. would be involved in an accident in their careers. Accidents mean stress, and more importantly, trauma, which is deeply rooted in mental illness.

Compound that with the fact that the average age of a Canadian truck driver today is just over 47 years old, and according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), by 40 years old, more than half of the population will have had or have a mental illness.

All of this seems alarming when you remember the fact that most drivers don’t spend much time at home, so getting professional help is unlikely because of the demands of the job.

Yet, it seems the industry is tight-lipped about what to do or how to help these drivers.

And this is likely due to the stigma attached to mental health problems, according to Nitika Rewari, the manager of workplace mental health, research, evaluation, and knowledge translation at MHCC.

“There is a large stigma that is associated with mental illness and many are afraid to speak up to their employers because they are scared they will be fired or judged for it,” she said.

As well, the trucking industry is extremely male dominated, with less than 3% of truck drivers being women.

“I would assume that this doesn’t help the disclosure rates,” Rewari added. “We find that disclosure of mental illness is less likely for men. We might find that in our society overall, males have been told to be the strong ones, to keep their emotions together and not show what their feelings are. And this leads to less disclosure.”

***

Al Goodhall, who has been driving trucks professionally since 1998, said he first suspected something was wrong when he snapped at his wife one day over the phone while on the road.

“It was 10 to 15 years ago,” he said. “And after I hung up, I thought, what’s going on? And then I starting looking at things like mental health, because I had never done that before or felt like that before.”

Goodhall figured he had depression, and didn’t seek any counselling for it. Partly because he felt it was a personal issue, and partly because of the nature of his job.

“(The depression) comes and goes,” he said. “I still deal with it fairly regularly. Once my grandkids were born, it was a real focus on the family again. I work every weekend so miss a lot, and that’s what really started playing it up again. It’s difficult being away for five or six days a week.

“The mental side is the deeply fatiguing side. You can finish a day on the road and you’re just wiped. And that’s a problem. Some people don’t feel like going for a walk, or eating properly. And the industry has put such a focus on exercise and eating right, but we haven’t been paying attention to the mental side of the game.”

Goodhall said he’s found help through mediation. Every day he’ll try and take between 20 and 30 minutes of his day to clear his mind and relax.

“It helps me to not overreact, to be patient to look at it and say, okay this is happening. This is frustrating, but at least you recognize it,” he said.

Like, Goodhall, David Henry, who has been driving professionally for 30 years, has also battled his share of mental illness throughout his career.

In 1991, the Manitoba native suffered a major head injury. And despite getting physically better from the injury, he ignored the mental side of things for about ten years until 2001.

In 2001, he was sleeping in his truck at a truck stop when a rookie driver smashed into his rig quite badly. Henry was thrown from the sleeper up to the cab.

“Although the amount of damage to my body was less in 2001, than in 1991, it compounded on itself,” he said.

It was then that Henry started getting mental help. He was diagnosed with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

“Drivers see a lot of stuff on the highways,” he said. “PTSD isn’t just for people who have been through war. Because I got woken up in the middle of the night…it was a traumatic experience…The amount of accidents we see, close calls we see…it’s a lot.”

Henry was off for a few years after that.

In May 2016 he fell off his trailer and injured his head once again. Shortly after that in December 2016, he went to rehabilitation facility in Winnipeg that focused on “body, mind, and soul” for four months.

Henry said the experience was life-changing.

“I ended up graduating the program,” he said. “And I’m not out of the woods for depression, I don’t think I’ll ever be…but I’ve learned a lot about mental health, and I’ve learned so much in dealing with other people and trying to help other people who are in the same position.”

When Henry returned to work in April 2017, he was fired.

“They didn’t want somebody that has had four major head injuries,” he said. “They didn’t like the fact that I went on compensation.”

So, instead, Henry did some research and job hunting and applied to work at REK Express.

“I finally found a company that walks the walk,” he said. “I’ve told them very openly what my problems are and they don’t treat me differently than they treat anyone else. They work hard to be a good workplace. It doesn’t matter whether you have mental health issues or don’t. Everyone here is treated with respect.”

Both Goodhall and Henry agreed that mental health needs to be discussed more in the industry as a whole, but didn’t seem hopeful that anything would be done about it any time soon.

***

Nitika Rewari says to combat the stigma surrounding mental illness, employers need to have policies in place that show support for their employees.

“Employers to have a duty to care,” she said. “They also have the tools in their box to make the process and policy changes. They have the right and resources to add to their employee assistance programs, and to provide more benefits for mental health. Employers also have the tools to invest in training programs, such as mental health first aid, etc.”

But employees also have a responsibility, she added.

“The employers won’t be able to identify which of those processes or training programs are needed or will be most useful to employees without hearing from them. Employees should provide feedback, whether its through focus group or surveys, or other discussion with managers. The other role of employees is to treat one another with respect, have relationships with coworkers with a non-judgemental attitude.

“So the employees are the ones who have to apply all of the changes that the employer will make and use the services if you have a mental problem.”

If you as an employer, don’t know where to start on creating a mental health policy, Rewari suggests reaching out to your health insurance provider, or trucking industry associations like Trucking HR Canada for guidance.


January 29th is Bell Let’s Talk day, visit their website for more resources and information.

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Resources for Foreign Workers

The BC Trucking Association (BCTA) has created a pamphlet to help truck drivers hired as Temporary Foreign Workers (TFWs) understand their rights, and what resources are available to them if they need help.

TFWs have the same rights as any other worker in Canada, and their employer must meet government standards related to hours of work; holidays; leave; dismissal and severance pay; wages and deductions; working conditions, etc.

A TFW must be offered the same job and the same or better wages and working conditions as those in the offer of employment. Their employer must also provide a workplace that is free from abuse. Workplaces should support worker safety and employers must provide proper training to employees when dealing with potentially dangerous conditions is part of the job. An employee also has the right to refuse unsafe work.

For more information:

  • See BCTA’s Foreign Worker Rights pamphlet
    • BCTA’s pamphlet provides contact information for government agencies that deal with workplace complaints, and workplace health and safety issues
  • Employment and Skills Development Canada document: Temporary foreign workers: Your rights are protected
  • Foreign workers can report abuse with the online reporting tool or by calling the Service Canada Confidential Tips Line at 1-866-602-9448.

Background

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program allows Canadian employers to hire foreign nationals to fill temporary labour or skill shortages when qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents are not available.

In order to hire TFWs, an employer must apply to ESDC for a labour market impact assessment (LMIA). If the employer successfully receives their LMIA confirmation letter from ESDC, they must provide a copy to the TFW, and advise them to apply to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada for a work permit. The employer is responsible for arranging the TFW’s compensation benefits, medical coverage, verifying that the employee has a SIN, and ensuring the conditions and time limits on the work permit are respected. The employer must also pay for round trip transportation to Canada and to their country of residence at the end of their work period.

Since the TFWP is designed to fill temporary shortages, TFWs are required a return to their country of residence after their work permit expires, or they can apply for permanent residence if they wish to remain in Canada. In BC this is possible through the Provincial Nominee Program, which accepts applicants working in long-haul trucking in its Skills Immigration – Entry Level and Semi-Skilled category.

 

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With Winter Approaching, it’s Time to Plan Ahead for Safe Driving

ShiftintoWinter.ca provides free tips and resources on how to stay safe in different driving conditions

Richmond, B.C., September 30, 2019 – The chance of being injured or killed in a motor vehicle crash in British Columbia increases dramatically in winter. That’s why the Winter Driving Safety Alliance is reminding motorists and employers to plan ahead and drive safely in winter conditions.

On average, each year in B.C., the number of casualty crashes due to driving too fast for the
conditions increases to about 236 crashes in December from about 126 in October – an 87 per cent increase (Crashes reported by police 2014 – 2018). For those who drive for work, about a third of all work-related crashes resulting in injury and time-loss claims occur in November, December and
January.

To get the drive safely message out, the Alliance is launching its 11th annual Shift into Winter
campaign. The launch coincides with the law requiring passenger vehicles driving on designated
highways in B.C. to have four matched winter tires (three-peaked mountain and snowflake, or mud and snow) with at least 3.5 mm of tread depth starting on October 1, while commercial vehicles must be equipped with chains.

The Shift into Winter campaign includes a website – ShiftintoWinter.ca – that provides information for motorists and employers on how to stay safe on the road this winter, whether they are driving for work or pleasure. To promote the campaign and website resources, the Alliance is running a series of ads in newspapers and magazines, on transit buses and radio, and through social media.

Winter means different things in different parts of the province. From rain and fog in the south, to snow and ice in the north. Winter conditions – such as colder temperatures, rain, snow, black ice, reduced visibility and fewer daylight hours – can present serious hazards for all drivers, professional and
otherwise.

The Winter Driving Safety Alliance offers the following tips for motorists:

  • Install a set of four matched winter tires.
  • Give your vehicle a pre-season maintenance check-up.
  • Keep an emergency kit in your vehicle.
  • Conditions change, so be prepared and plan ahead:
    o Check current road and weather conditions on DriveBC.ca – If possible, postpone your
    plans and avoid driving when road and weather conditions are poor.
    o Plan your route ahead of time – Tell someone where you’re going and when you expect
    to arrive and avoid any roads that may become dangerous during bad weather
  • Slow down – The posted speed limit is the maximum speed under ideal driving conditions. If
    inclement weather hits, slow down and drive with extra care.
  • Maintain a safe following distance – Look ahead and keep at least four seconds of distance
    between you and the vehicle in front.
  • Invest in winter driving training – Learn how to brake safely, get out of a skid, and how your car handles in winter weather.

More tips for motorists on how to prepare themselves and their vehicles can be found on
ShiftintoWinter.ca.

Employers have a legal responsibility to ensure the health and safety of their employees who drive for work, regardless of whether they drive a company-owned or personal vehicle. ShiftIntoWinter.ca provides information and resources that can help reduce the risks employees face when driving during winter. For employers and supervisors, there is a winter driving safety online course, and an employer toolkit that includes policy and procedures templates and more. For drivers, there are resources on how to prepare your vehicle and yourself for winter driving and an online quiz to test your knowledge.

Quotes:
Hon. Harry Bains, Minister of Labour
“Winter conditions can be hazardous and challenging for everyone on B.C.’s roads, including those who drive for work. Employers and supervisors have a responsibility to ensure the health and safety of their employees at the workplace, which includes when they are behind the wheel. So please – shift into winter!”

  •  Click here for a video message from the Minister.

Hon. Claire Trevena, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure
“Winter is on its way and I urge people to make sure they use good winter tires, slow down when driving in winter conditions, and plan ahead by checking DriveBC. Conditions can change quickly on B.C. highways, especially for drivers leaving the Lower Mainland for more mountainous terrain. We want everyone to drive safely and get home to their families this winter.”

  • Click here for a video message from the Minister.

Lindsay Matthews, Vice-President of Public Affairs and Driver Licensing, ICBC
“We’re pleased to be part of the Winter Driving Safety Alliance and help drivers prepare for winter driving in B.C. When severe winter weather hits, consider alternatives if available where you live – take public transit or a taxi, carpool with a confident driver whose vehicle is equipped for the conditions, work from home, or at least wait until the road crews have cleared major roads. Sometimes the best option is to leave the car at home.”

Al Johnson, Vice-President, Prevention Services, WorkSafeBC
“The Shift into Winter campaign reminds all of us who travel on B.C. roads for work – whether they are paved highways or secondary forestry roads – to be prepared, and to adjust your driving to the conditions. You need to have a plan to anticipate snow, ice, rain or fog regardless of where you live and as conditions change, so should your speed. Employers need to ensure the health and safety of their workers when they drive for work.”

About the Winter Driving Safety Alliance
The Shift into Winter campaign is a joint, provincial initiative led by the Winter Driving Safety Alliance – a group of about 20 organizations committed to working together to improve safe winter driving behaviours and practices in BC. Members include Ambulance Paramedics of B.C. (CUPE 873), Automotive Retailers Association, BCAA, BC Forest Safety Council, BC Road Builders and Heavy Construction Association, BC Trucking Association, City of Prince George, Concrete BC, Government of BC, Insurance Corporation of BC, Justice Institute of British Columbia, Kal Tire, Mainroad Group, RCMP, SafetyDriven, Tiger Calcium, Tire and Rubber Association of Canada, Wilson M Beck Insurance Group, and WorkSafeBC.

– 30 –

For more information:
Ralph Eastman
Sr. Manager Government & Media Relations
WorkSafeBC
Media Line: 604.276.5157
media@worksafebc.com


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Congratulations to Tymac Launch Services Ltd., Super Swift Power Sweeping, and Staples Canada For Getting COR Certified!

Congratulations to our new COR certified companies: Tymac Launch Services Ltd. (pictured below), Super Swift Power Sweeping and Staples Canada who have all achieved a Certificate of Recognition through SafetyDriven – Trucking Safety Council of BC!

 

Tymac Launch Services Ltd.

The Certification of Recognition is an initiative that recognizes and rewards employers who develop and implement sustainable occupational health and safety programs. Their COR programs meet or exceed provincial requirements by taking a “best practices” approach to health and safety.

Companies who achieve COR – which involves standards for documentation, participation in training, an internal review process, and an on-site audit – are eligible for WorkSafeBC premium rebates of up to 10 percent.

Learn more about the COR program.

List of COR Certified companies.

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Free Training for Aspiring Women Drivers in B.C.

Source: Trucknews.com

LANGLEY, B.C. — Attention hopeful female truck drivers in B.C., there is an opportunity that may be hard for you to pass up.

Valley Driving School is facilitating driver training for the YWCA’s Changing Gears program, which aims to get more women behind the wheel of a truck, and it’s free to all qualified applicants.

The program is a 23-week Class 1 driver training course for women who are on employment insurance or have received benefits within the past five years.

Joel Donnelly, operations at Valley Driving School, said training covers a variety of areas, including a combination of in-class, in-yard, and on-road instruction.

Students will learn about air brakes, the transportation of dangerous goods, the National Safety Code, and other topics in-class, while both city and mountain driving will be covered on the road, with 68 and 24 hours of instruction respectively.

The program has been offered for some time now, beginning in November of 2015.

“To date, there have been over 50 students who have successfully taken part in this amazing opportunity,” said Donnelly, “including a new intake.”

In addition to the employment insurance stipulation, there are several criteria women need to meet to take advantage of the Changing Gears program. They must possess a valid Class 5 B.C. driver’s license with a clean abstract, have no outstanding fines or bridge tolls, speak English, be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, and be able to commit to the 23-weeks of full-time training.

Valley Driving School also requires a valid Class 1 learner’s license and the desire to become a safe, independent driver.

Valley Driving School does not limit itself to helping women get into the industry. It also partners with organizations like WorkSafeBC and Douglas College to entice both men and women into trucking.

The YWCA’s Changing Gears program is a project-based labour market training program.

It is funded through WorkBC to support projects that provide benefits to the community and to individuals with a combination of on- and off-the-job training delivered under a project-based training model to assist eligible individuals obtain the skills they need for employment.

Valley Driving School, which has been providing driver training since 1955, offers customized instruction to aspiring drivers of all ages.

“Our programs are designed to include one-on-one on-road training with a strong focus on road safety and accident prevention,” said Donnelly.

The school is also a supporter of the implementation of a mandatory entry-level training (MELT) program in B.C. for Class 1 drivers.

“MELT for commercial driver training, done with proper thought, consultation, and consideration,” said Donnelly, “would only serve to better prepare individuals and provide a stronger base for safe, independent driving within the commercial transportation industry.”


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May Brake Inspection Blitz Results are in!

Source: Truckinginfo.com

More than 1,600 commercial vehicles were placed out of service during an unannounced brake inspection blitz in May conducted by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s law enforcement members.

On May 15, 2019, law enforcement personnel from 55 jurisdictions in the U.S. and Canada conducted 10,358 commercial motor vehicle inspections, focused on brake system violations. Of those inspections, 16.1% of vehicles (1,667) were found to have brake-related critical vehicle inspection items.

Inspectors paid particular attention to violations involving brake hoses and tubing. The event found 996 units with chafed rubber hoses and 185 units with chafed thermoplastic hoses. All told, there were 1,125 violations of 49 Code of Federal Regulations § 393.45 and Canadian equivalent violations that included chafed rubber hoses and 124 violations of 49 Code of Federal Regulations § 393.45 and Canadian equivalent violations that included kinked thermoplastic hoses.

“Brake hoses and tubing must be properly attached, undamaged, without leaks and appropriately flexible,” said Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police, CVSA president. “Because they are such an important part of the braking system, the failure of hoses or tubing can cause problems for the entire braking system.”

In the U.S. 16.6% of commercial vehicles were placed out of service for brake violations compared to 14.5% in Canada.

According to FMCSA’s Analysis and Information Online 2019 calendar year data snapshot as of June 28, 2019, out of 1.8 million inspections, the top five brake-related violations were:

  • Clamp or roto type brake out of adjustment (86,296)
  • CMV manufactured after Oct. 19, 1994, has an automatic brake adjustment system that fails to compensate for wear (45,594)
  • Brake hose or tubing chafing and/or kinking (37,737)
  • No or defective ABS malfunction indicator lamp for trailer manufactured after March 1, 1998 (37,343)
  • Inoperative/defective brakes (32,125)CVSA conducts brake-focused enforcement events, such as Brake Safety Day, to identify and remove commercial motor vehicles with dangerous brake issues from our roadways to reduce the number of crashes caused by or made more severe by deficient braking system performance.

CVSA is holding another brake safety enforcement event this year, Brake Safety Week, which is scheduled for Sept.15-21, at participating jurisdictions throughout North America. The week is an annual outreach and enforcement campaign designed to improve commercial motor vehicle brake safety.

Brake Safety Day and Brake Safety Week are inspection, enforcement, education and awareness initiatives that are part of the Operation Airbrake Program sponsored by CVSA in partnership with FMCSA and the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators.

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May Brake Inspection Blitz Results are in!

Source: Truckinginfo.com

More than 1,600 commercial vehicles were placed out of service during an unannounced brake inspection blitz in May conducted by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s law enforcement members.

On May 15, 2019, law enforcement personnel from 55 jurisdictions in the U.S. and Canada conducted 10,358 commercial motor vehicle inspections, focused on brake system violations. Of those inspections, 16.1% of vehicles (1,667) were found to have brake-related critical vehicle inspection items.

Inspectors paid particular attention to violations involving brake hoses and tubing. The event found 996 units with chafed rubber hoses and 185 units with chafed thermoplastic hoses. All told, there were 1,125 violations of 49 Code of Federal Regulations § 393.45 and Canadian equivalent violations that included chafed rubber hoses and 124 violations of 49 Code of Federal Regulations § 393.45 and Canadian equivalent violations that included kinked thermoplastic hoses.

“Brake hoses and tubing must be properly attached, undamaged, without leaks and appropriately flexible,” said Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police, CVSA president. “Because they are such an important part of the braking system, the failure of hoses or tubing can cause problems for the entire braking system.”

In the U.S. 16.6% of commercial vehicles were placed out of service for brake violations compared to 14.5% in Canada.

According to FMCSA’s Analysis and Information Online 2019 calendar year data snapshot as of June 28, 2019, out of 1.8 million inspections, the top five brake-related violations were:

  • Clamp or roto type brake out of adjustment (86,296)
  • CMV manufactured after Oct. 19, 1994, has an automatic brake adjustment system that fails to compensate for wear (45,594)
  • Brake hose or tubing chafing and/or kinking (37,737)
  • No or defective ABS malfunction indicator lamp for trailer manufactured after March 1, 1998 (37,343)
  • Inoperative/defective brakes (32,125)CVSA conducts brake-focused enforcement events, such as Brake Safety Day, to identify and remove commercial motor vehicles with dangerous brake issues from our roadways to reduce the number of crashes caused by or made more severe by deficient braking system performance.

CVSA is holding another brake safety enforcement event this year, Brake Safety Week, which is scheduled for Sept.15-21, at participating jurisdictions throughout North America. The week is an annual outreach and enforcement campaign designed to improve commercial motor vehicle brake safety.

Brake Safety Day and Brake Safety Week are inspections, enforcement, education and awareness initiatives that are part of the Operation Airbrake Program sponsored by CVSA in partnership with FMCSA and the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators.


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Introducing City of Vancouver’s Guide to Starting a Small Business 11

And it’s easy to see why. If you’re staring out the window at a warm summer scene, productivity is probably quite far down the priority list. Nobody wants to be cooped up behind a desk while others play outside. So, how do you ensure you get the important tasks done during these tempting months?

Luckily, there are several steps you can take as a leader to ensure your business doesn’t miss a beat during the dog days of summer. Below, we’ve rounded up five easy to implement tips for staying productive in summer.

Hold Meetings Outside

The sun is beating down outside while you and your team are cooped up in a meeting room. Nobody enjoys a scenario like this, so why not move your meetings to the great outdoors? If there’s a park or outdoor seating area near your place of business, bring the team outside. This more casual setting can spark a more relaxed attitude among your team and even get the creative suggestions flowing! There’s also the increase in Vitamin D and endorphins you’ll enjoy.

More Flexible Hours

Granting your employees leeway with their hours of work can cut down on absenteeism and increase their morale. A growing number of businesses are employing progressive models such as the 9/80 schedule during the summer months, allowing staff greater time off, while still ensuring required work is carried out. With rising fuel costs and commute times, schedules such as these can prove valuable to your employees’ work-life balance and their wallet.

Set Deadlines

It’s difficult to remain focused without a clear deadline in sight, especially when you’re feeling the lure of a sun-kissed patio. Set yourself achievable deadlines for projects and share them with your employees. Encourage your staff to hold you accountable and ask you how the work is progressing. It’s been proven time and again that an accountability partner is a powerful driver for achievement.

Switch Off

Hands up, who has their work email or Slack account attached to their personal phone? When you are away from the workplace it’s crucial to switch off and enjoy some time to yourself. Resist the temptation to respond to work emails. Giving yourself some time to recharge will see you return to work refreshed and feeling productive.

Start Your Day Right

Across a multi-year Harvard study, progress was proven to be the top motivator of performance. Use this positive feedback loop to compel yourself to get things done. Get the ball rolling each morning by completing one important task. Resist the temptation to surf the web or daydream while looking out the window. Starting your day on a note of positivity can provide momentum to keep you rolling until it’s time to go home.

Here to Help

No matter what stage of business, or what problem you face, Small Business BC offers a range of seminars and one-on-one advisory sessions to suit any business.

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